Eleanor Antin

Eleanor Antin, The Two Eleanors, 1973.

Eleanor Antin An Afternoon with Eleanora Antinova (a.k.a. Eleanor Antin)

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery MAP
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In conjunction with the exhibition Multiple Occupancy: Eleanor Antin’s “Selves,” Eleanor Antin reads and discusses excerpts, some unpublished, from the memoirs of her invented character, Eleanora Antinova, the African American ballerina of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes. Antinova was a misfit: modernist in an artworld that clung to classicism, black when ballet’s star parts were written for white bodies, aging in an industry that celebrates youth. Because of these contradictions, history found no place for her and ultimately she was forgotten. Between 1972 and 1991 Antin embodied Antinova, depicting the plight of history’s lost ballerina in an extensive body of work. At Performa 13 Antin animates the many faces of Antinova and reflects on their invention through the character’s writings: Recollections of My Life with Diaghilev (1972-1976) recounts anecdotes from the ballerina’s heyday as a star of the Ballets Russes.

An Afternoon with Eleanora Antinova (a.k.a. Eleanor Antin) is presented by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University.

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